Top 41 Prospect Review: #11-15; Michael Fulmer through Aderlin Rodriguez

Again, this is a post-season review of my Preseason Top 41 Mets Prospects, which I’m making part of the Mets’ minor league season in review.

As far as the Top Prospect review pieces, part five, on players 16-20 is here, part four, on players 21-25 is here, part three, on players 26-30 is here, part two on players 31-35 is here, part one, on players #36-41 is here.

 

#11 – RHP Michael Fulmer
What I Thought: I liked Fulmer’s size, build and raw stuff (an average or better fastball, and the ability to spin a breaking ball) in a brief viewing in the Gulf Coast League in 2011. 
Reality: The Mets challenged Fulmer with an opening day assignment to Savannah and he responded very well, improving over the course of the year against older competition. Pitching Coach Frank Viola raved about Fulmer’s aptitude, work ethic and maturity from day one. His fastball at 93-95 mph, ate up SAL hitters. He and Viola prioritized working on his slider over the curveball. As the year went on, scouts’ grades on the pitch inched upward. He started throwing his changeup more, although it tended towards too firm. He made some mechanical adjustments, tucking his front hip, to give him better tempo and timing in his delivery. 
Stock: UP. 
On the Next Top 41? Top 5.

Basic


ERA G/GS IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WP
2011 GCL 10.13 4/3 5.33 9 7 6 0 4 10 1 1
2012 SAL 2.74 21/21 108.3 92 37 33 6 38 101 6 8

Advanced


BB/9 SO/9 SO/BB HR/9 H/9 R/9 BB% SO% TBF
2011 GCL 6.8 16.9 2.5 0.0 15.2 11.8 12.9 32.3 31
2012 SAL 3.2 8.4 2.7 0.5 7.6 3.1 8.4 22.2 454

 

 

#12 – 2B Jordany Valdespin
What I Thought: He would play second base in the big leagues, where his lack of plate discipline would hurt his value.  
Reality: Bingo. He played second an a whole bunch of centerfield in the big leagues where his lack of plate discipline (4.9% walk rate) hurt his value on the way to a .286 on-base percentage. 
Stock: Similar. Valdespin is who we thought he was. 
On the Next Top 41? Nope. Graduated.

Basic


G AB H 2B 3B HR BB SO SF SAC HBP AVG OBP SLG
2011 AA 107 404 120 24 3 15 21 68 2 7 7 .297 .341 .483
2011 AAA 27 107 30 8 0 2 4 25 1 1 0 .280 .304 .411
2011 Total 134 511 150 32 3 17 25 93 3 8 7 .294 .333 .468
2012 AAA 39 151 43 2 1 5 10 22 1 0 1 .285 .331 .411
2012 MLB 94 191 46 9 1 8 10 44 0 3 2 .241 .286 .424

Advanced


XBH% SO% BB% HR% BABIP ISO
2011 AA 9.5 15.4 4.8 3.4 .325 .186
2011 AAA 8.8 22.1 3.5 1.8 .346 .131
2011 Total 9.4 16.8 4.5 3.1 .329 .174
2012 AAA 4.9 13.5 6.1 3.1 .304 .126
2012 MLB 8.7 21.4 4.9 3.9 .273 .183

 

 

#13 – LHP Darin Gorski
What I Thought: Coming off a dominant 2011 in the Florida State League, Gorski had a chance to stick at the back end of a big league rotation. 
Reality: Gorski was ordinary at AA. The key was that his command regressed. His walk rate climbed back to the rate of 2010 in the South Atlantic League and his strikeout rate dipped to its lowest rate in full-season ball.  
Stock: Down.
On the Next Top 41? Yeah.

Basic


ERA G/GS IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WP
2010 SAL 4.58 25/18 114 125 70 58 12 43 109 10 9
2011 FSL 2.08 27/21 138.67 109 40 32 11 29 140 7 7
2012 EL 4.00 25/24 139.67 128 68 62 20 50 118 4 13

Advanced


BB/9 SO/9 SO/BB HR/9 H/9 R/9 BB% SO% HR% TBF
2010 SAL 3.4 8.6 2.5 0.9 9.9 5.5 8.4 21.3 2.3 511
2011 FSL 1.9 9.1 4.8 0.7 7.1 2.6 5.2 25.2 2.0 555
2012 EL 3.2 7.6 2.4 1.3 8.2 4.4 8.6 20.2 3.4 584

 

 

#14 – RHP Domingo Tapia
What I Thought: He was big and threw hard and had a changeup and that was enough for me.
Reality: He’s big, and he throws really hard out of a low arm slot with movement, and that makes him a fine prospect. Tapia, who regularly hit 99 mph, has one of the best fastballs in the system alongside only Zack Wheeler. His two-seamer can be unhittable at times with sink. He started working more with a four-seamer as well as the year went on. His second pitch is a changeup at 88-91 that when it’s right, disappears down. Up, it becomes an ordinary fastball. His breaking ball came and went; at times he showed the makings of a viable slider, but he threw it less during the second half to focus on his two fastballs and changeup. 
Stock: Up a little.
On the Next Top 41? Duh.

Basic


ERA G/GS IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WP
2011 APP 3.78 11/11 50 50 28 21 3 16 30 1 5
2011 NYP 0.00 1/1 6 5 0 0 0 0 6 0 0
2012 SAL 3.98 20/19 108.67 92 55 48 2 32 101 2 5

Advanced


BB/9 SO/9 SO/BB HR/9 H/9 R/9 BB% SO% TBF
2011 APP 2.9 5.4 1.9 0.5 9.0 5.0 7.5 14.1 213
2011 NYP 0.0 9.0 INF 0.0 7.5 0.0 0.0 27.3 22
2012 SAL 2.7 8.4 3.2 0.2 7.6 4.6 7.1 22.3 452

 

 

#15 – 3B Aderlin Rodriguez
What I Thought: I loved Rodriguez’s power. 
Reality: He led all Mets’ minor leaguers with 24 homeruns. He figured out the South Atlantic League as a 20-year old hitting a very loud .307/.368/.555 from May 1 until he was promoted to advanced-A St. Lucie on July 12. After a slow first two weeks in July, in the FSL, he bounced back to hit .278/.321/.519 in 21 games in August. Rodriguez made modest improvements defensively at third and started working seriously at first base, playing 10 games at the position between Savannah and St. Lucie. 
Stock: Up. 
On the Next Top 41? Definitely.

Basic


G AB H 2B 3B HR BB SO AVG OBP SLG
2011 SAL 131 516 114 23 2 17 29 106 .221 .265 .372
2012 SAL Total 83 318 87 21 1 16 29 71 .274 .336 .497
2012 April 24 100 20 6 1 3 8 24 .200 .266 .370
SAL After May 1 59 218 67 15 0 13 21 47 .307 .368 .555
FSL 42 153 37 5 0 8 8 30 .242 .288 .431
2012 Total 125 471 124 26 1 24 37 101 .263 .321 .476

Advanced


XBH% SO% BB% HR% BABIP
2011 SAL 7.6 19.2 5.2 3.1 .245
2012 SAL Total 10.8 20.2 8.2 4.5 .305
2012 April 9.2 22.0 7.3 2.8 .233
2012 Since May
1
11.5 19.3 8.6 5.3 .338
FSL 8.0 18.4 4.9 4.9 .252
2012 Total 9.9 19.6 7.2 4.7 .287